Verbs that take a direct object in English do not necessarily take a direct object in French

Verbs that take a direct object in English do not necessarily take a direct object in French

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Verbs that take a direct object in English do not necessarily take a direct object in French. The  following verbs take an indirect object in French because they are followed by à: convenir à  (to suit)  désobéir à  (to disobey)  faire honte à  (to shame)  faire mal à  (to hurt)  faire peur à  (to frighten)  obéir à  (to obey)  plaire à  (to please)  répondre à  (to answer)  ressembler à  (to resemble)  téléphoner à  (to call)  The expression  penser à  (to think about) is followed by a stress pronoun; for example,  Je pense à  lui/elle . (I think about him/her).  The following verbs require an indirect object because they are followed by à. Note the correct 
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This note was uploaded on 11/08/2011 for the course FR 101 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '08 term at Texas State.

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Verbs that take a direct object in English do not necessarily take a direct object in French

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