Chap002 4 - to silver at 1 mark per ounce of silver. What...

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11. Suppose that your country officially defines gold as ten times more valuable than silver (i.e. the central bank stands ready to redeem the currency in gold and silver and the official price of gold is ten times the official price of silver). If the market price of gold is only eight times as much as silver. A. The central bank could go broke if enough arbitrageurs attempt to take advantage of the pricing disparity. B. The central bank will make money since they are overpricing gold. 12. Prior to the 1870s, both gold and silver were used as international means of payment and the exchange rates among currencies were determined by either their gold or silver contents. Suppose that the dollar was pegged to gold at $30 per ounce, the French franc is pegged to gold at 90 francs per ounce and to silver at 9 francs per ounce of silver, and the German mark pegged
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Unformatted text preview: to silver at 1 mark per ounce of silver. What would the exchange rate between the U.S. dollar and German mark be under this system? A. 1 German mark = $2 B. 1 German mark = $0.50 C. 1 German mark = $3 D. 1 German mark = $1 13. Prior to the 1870s, both gold and silver were used as international means of payment and the exchange rates among currencies were determined by either their gold or silver contents. Suppose that the dollar was pegged to gold at $30 per ounce, the French franc is pegged to gold at 90 francs per ounce and to silver at 6 francs per ounce of silver, and the German mark pegged to silver at 1 mark per ounce of silver. What would the exchange rate between the U.S. dollar and German mark be under this system? A. 1 German mark = $2 B. 1 German mark = $0.50 C. 1 German mark = $3 D. 1 German mark = $1...
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This note was uploaded on 11/09/2011 for the course FIN IFMG201 taught by Professor Eun during the Spring '11 term at Michigan Flint.

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