2.Job_Design.Motivation

2.Job_Design.Motivation - JobDesign:Motivation MGT315 Scott...

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Job Design: Motivation MGT 315 Scott
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2 Class Agenda Job Design and Motivation Motivation Defined Theories of Motivation Content Theories Process Theories
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Organizing Model
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Job Design Job  design  (and job  redesign ) focuses  on jobs that are either being created or  changed in some manner The process of defining how work will be  performed and what tasks will be required  in a given job
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Job Design and Motivation Why make jobs as motivating as possible? Human resources are easier to manage if  jobs are designed to be intrinsically enjoyable  and motivating This places less pressure on many specific  areas of HRM: Performance Management Compensation Retention
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Motivation Who cares? Motivation is crucial for organizations Organizations have trouble “motivating” their  employees A primary job of a manager is to  motivate  employees Employees are motivated for different  reasons, so it’s important to know all  motivational options
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Motivation Defined Motivation is the combined effects on  behavior of three choices:  Direction   - the choice to expend effort (will I  study?) Intensity  - the choice of the level of effort to  expend (I’ll study really hard) Persistence   - the choice to persist at that level  (Everyone’s going to the Riv? Study time is  over…)
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What Motivates Employees? CONTENT THEORIES Emphasize the reasons for  motivated behavior;  consider factors that “drive”  behavior Need Theory Two-Factor Theory Job Characteristics Theory PROCESS THEORIES Focus on how behavior  change occurs; how a  person comes to act in  a different way Reinforcement Theory Expectancy Theory Goal-Setting Theory Equity Theory
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What Motivates Employees? CONTENT THEORIES Emphasize the reasons for  motivated behavior;  consider factors that “drive”  behavior Need Theory Two-Factor Theory Job Characteristics Theory
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Maslow’s Need Hierarchy:  Problems What is a “need?” Do people only focus on higher-order  needs once lower-order ones are  satisfied? There is no evidence that individuals arrange  their “needs” in a specific hierarchy, moving  from one level to the next The theory has received virtually no  support
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Hertzberg’s two-factor theory HYGIENE FACTORS Create  dissatisfaction  when they  are not present Technical supervision Interpersonal relationships  with peers Fair salary Adequate working 
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2.Job_Design.Motivation - JobDesign:Motivation MGT315 Scott...

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