Lecture 12 - 12. Information Transfer V The cell cycle....

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12. Information Transfer V The cell cycle. Iain McKinnell Dept Biology
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Cell division in either prokaryotes or eukaryotes must be accompanied by replication of DNA
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The Bacterial Chromosome Closed, circular molecule of DNA packed into nucleoid region of cell Replication begins from a single origin, proceeds in both directions Plasmids (in many bacteria) replicate independently of the host chromosome
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Initiation… Begins at Origin of replication (OriC) 3 AT rich 13 bp regions + four 9 bp regions. Binds the pre-replication complex. Binding of DnaA proteins to 9bp region DNA coils around protein core Three 13bp regions melt/unwind Binding of DnaB (helicase) & it’s co -factor DnaC (helicase loader) to both ends of the melted region Replication fork site is established …. DnaG (Primase) primes each template Gyrase (Topoisomerase) relieves twisting of DNA .
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Termination… Termination sequences Tus proteins Disassembly of the replisome Separation of daughter molecules by Topoisomerase IV
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Rolling Circle Replication Fig. 13-20, p. 292 Plasmids (in many bacteria) replicate independently of the host chromosome
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Why do cells divide? Reproduce the organism (prokaryotes). If the organism is eukaryote, cells divide to reproduce organism (unicellular yeasts), replace dead cells or to allow the organism to grow.
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Binary Fission Replication occupies most of the cell cycle in rapidly
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This note was uploaded on 11/08/2011 for the course BIOL 1103 taught by Professor Mckinnel during the Fall '11 term at Carleton CA.

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Lecture 12 - 12. Information Transfer V The cell cycle....

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