Decolonization-2010

Decolonization-2010 - CuttingColonialTies (1947-1970)

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Cutting Colonial Ties (1947-1970) This week’s lecture examines how World War II cut the cords of the colonial  system, seemingly ending centuries of European domination over the world.   This lecture will outline this dramatic story from a global perspective  examining decolonization as a nationalist movement that evolved in time  and space.  We will examine how decolonization impacted various world  regions differently before taking up a case study of the Congo to consider  the broader post colonial question: why has Sub-Saharan Africa struggled  since winning independence?
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Last Week: We commenced our investigation of the  pillars of the post war order by  examining two countervailing trends: the  birth of a network of international  institutions designed to reform the old  regime, and the commencement of the  Cold War between the USA and USSR  that divided Europe and ultimately the  globe into two superpower blocs.
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Today We are going to explore another pillar of  the postwar world, the demise of  European colonial system, at least its  outward form.
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Today: Cutting Colonial Ties (1947-1970) I. Decolonization: Historical Roots and Precipitating  Conditions II. Decolonization in Global Perspective (1947-1970) III. Independence Movements in Sub-Saharan Africa  (1957-1966) IV. Summary
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Colonialism at a glance 1800-1940 Origins of Native Nationalism 1941-1946 WWII and the Crystallization  of Colonial Independence Movements 1947-1956 Take-Off Stage of  Decolonization 1957-1974 Apogee of Decolonization 1975-Present Travails of Post-Colonial  Africa
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Discussion: Taking Stock: When we say  ‘colonialism’ what precisely do we  mean? Briefly outline its principal features and  characteristics.
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I. Decolonization: Historical Roots and  Precipitating Conditions A. Minimalist Definition of Colonialism A multi-dimensional system through  which an industrial power dominated the  resources and lives of non-Europeans  in distant places. After World War II, From cities in India to  the jungles dotting the Gold Coast of Africa,  nationalist leaders proclaimed their right to  “self-determination”, which they increasingly  came to view as independence from their  colonial masters. 
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B. Overlapping Dimensions Control Strategic Resources:  European nations had sought out colonies  throughout the world in order to monopolize scarce and strategic  resources from neighboring competitors. Economic Underdevelopment:
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This note was uploaded on 11/08/2011 for the course HIS 1111 taught by Professor Steve during the Fall '11 term at University of Ottawa.

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Decolonization-2010 - CuttingColonialTies (1947-1970)

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