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Welfare State - Welfare Who made you The 1942 Beveridge...

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“Welfare” Our first segment traces the gestation of the idea of “welfare” in response to the Great Depression and the horrors of World War II. Subsequently, we examine its manifestation in three different postwar hearths: Western Europe, the communist bloc, and North America. The 1942 Beveridge Report laid the conceptual foundations for the welfare state in Britain. A model of social and governmental reform that proved influential throughout Europe. Support for the principle of ‘welfare’ was universal following the war, yet its manifestation in Eastern and Western Europe and North America varied according to prevailing conditions. Who made you?
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Last Segment: We examined how World War II precipitated the gradual demise of colonialism. The Belgian Congo was used as a case study for exploring the challenges, hardships, and limitations associated with independence in Sub-Saharan Africa in particular and the Third World in general. Did colonialism end with formal independence, or did the struggle to build economically and politically viable states only just begin? What does the story of the Congo tell us about post-colonial struggles in Sub- Saharan Africa?
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Today: In our final week investigating the pillars of the postwar World Order, we will examine the emergence of the welfare state. The first segment is focused on Eastern and Western Europe. The second segment explores the North American version of welfare. The end of the Cold War has opened up a conceptual space for viewing some of the parallels between Eastern Communism and Western socialism. Clement Atlee, don’t diss the stache! Before the Red Terror, there was a lot of indigenous enthusiasm for socialist reforms in Eastern Europe.
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Birth of the Welfare State (1946-1970) I. Origins of the Welfare State II. Britain and Western European Social Democracy III. Eastern Europe’s Experiment in People’s Democracy IV. Summary: Was there a European modality of welfare?
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Overview 1929-1944 Gestation of the Welfare Ideal Great Depression 1945-1967 Implementation of the Welfare State Golden Age of Bretton Woods 1968-1979 Crisis of the Welfare System Stagflation 1980-2000 Triumph of the American Dream Neo-lIberalism
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Discussion: What features constitute the welfare state?
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A. Origins of the Welfare State In both East and West, with the closure of World War II, there, was a prevailing mood for reforming the economy and government. This deeply felt progressive aspiration drew energy from a profound dissatisfaction with laissez-faire capitalism that could not pull itself out of global depression, the social inequality that had marred the ideals of prewar democracies, and xenophobic nationalism that had unleashed such destructive forces. This postwar aspiration found its most explicit focus in the creation of the modern “welfare” state, which despite significant differences in form, serves as a model for society and government throughout the world today.
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A. Origins of the Welfare State 1. World War II’s Impact 1941-1945 i. Psychological drain of “total war” ii.
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