Corruption_article

Corruption_article - Corruption Poverty And Corruption...

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Corruption Poverty And Corruption Michael Johnston 01.22.09, 6:00 PM ET Corruption often conjures up images of people getting rich. But in fact, corruption's connections to poverty are far more numerous and pervasive. Corruption delays, distorts and diverts economic growth. It comes in a variety of forms, and while no two countries are alike, there are common dilemmas for all to see. The links between corruption and poverty affect both individuals and businesses, and they run in both directions: poverty invites corruption, while corruption deepens poverty. Corruption both causes and thrives upon weaknesses in key economic, political and social institutions. It is a form of self-serving influence akin to a heavily regressive tax, benefiting the haves at the expense of the have-nots. Trust -- essential to financial markets and effective governments everywhere--is difficult to build in poor and corrupt societies. Poor people and economically strapped businesses have few economic alternatives, and where serious corruption is the norm, they are even more vulnerable to exploitation. In that sense, there is no such thing as "petty" corruption: police shakedowns in a public market, or roadblocks in the countryside where farmers must pay up in order to transport produce to the city, may yield seemingly trivial sums of money, but they help keep poor
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This note was uploaded on 11/10/2011 for the course ECON 4310 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at Kennesaw.

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Corruption_article - Corruption Poverty And Corruption...

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