In%20Buenos%20Aires%20Neighborhoods%20of%20Misery_Wash%20Post

In%20Buenos%20Aires%20Neighborhoods%20of%20Misery_Wash%20Post

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In Buenos Aires, 'Neighborhoods of Misery' Slums Growing Despite Efforts to Transform Them By Monte Reel Washington Post Foreign Service Sunday, April 29, 2007; A18 BUENOS AIRES -- About 1,500 people used to live in Villa Cartón, a slapdash cluster of hundreds of crooked shacks wedged beneath a highway overpass. Scrap-wood walls were reinforced with cardboard, old bedsheets curtained window frames. Walkways were clogged with pushcarts full of bottles and paper, the recyclable refuse that many of the people who lived there scavenged for a living. In February, someone set fire to the shantytown, and the pumper trucks that eventually arrived could do little but water its ashes. But the fire -- and the saga that followed as officials tried to relocate the residents -- has laid bare a problem that Buenos Aires and other metropolises face as they grapple with growing slums. The most precarious parts of the city, however undesirable, are among the hardest to replace. About one-third of the world's urban dwellers live in slums, and the United Nations estimates that the number of people living in such conditions will double by 2030 as a result of rapid urbanization in developing countries. Latin America is already the most urbanized region in the developing world, but even in places where rural migration to urban areas has begun to level off -- such as Argentina -- slums within cities continue to grow at a fast pace, through good economic times and bad. "Throughout Latin America you have economies that are growing and doing well, but the way the economies are growing is actually generating more shantytowns," said Erik Vittrup, senior adviser on Latin America and the Caribbean for the U.N. Human Settlements Program. "It's a growth that is just generating wealth for those who have it." Buenos Aires is recovering from a devastating economic crash in 2001, and its economy has grown by more than 8 percent annually over the past four years. Even so, population growth in the capital is fastest in its shantytowns, which continue to pop up beside railroad tracks, appear under bridges and even expand across the grounds of an ecological reserve. The government has promoted a plan to eradicate two dozen of the worst slums -- all of
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This note was uploaded on 11/10/2011 for the course ECON 4310 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at Kennesaw.

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In%20Buenos%20Aires%20Neighborhoods%20of%20Misery_Wash%20Post

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