Chapter3 - Chapter 3 Muscular Strength and Endurance Key Terms ability of a muscle to exert Muscular strength The maximum force against resistance

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Chapter 3 Muscular Strength and Endurance
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Key Terms Muscular strength: The ability of a muscle to exert maximum force against resistance Measured by the maximal amount one can lift in a single effort- 1 rep max (1RM) Muscular endurance: The ability of a muscle to exert submaximal force repeatedly over time Measured by number of submaximal reps an individual can perform Muscle Power : combination of strength and speed, more important to skill performance than health related fitness Power training emphasizing speed increases endurance Power training emphasizing heavy resistance increases strength
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Functions of the Musculoskeletal System 600 muscles make up ~ 40% of our body weight. Key functions include: movement, maintaining posture, generating body heat, and assisting in returning blood to heart (by muscle contractions Metabolism- the greater the mass, the greater the expenditure of energy(calories) at rest and work
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Role of Strength in Good Health Strength/endurance increases as a result of growth & maturation at early ages, however we often see a decline in both genders starting b/t 25-40 yrs, and continuing into old age. As we age muscle fibers tend to decline in general Rate of decline varies (25-40%), and is dependent upon changes in muscle fibers 1. Loss of mass/size is likely the largest contributor to loss of strength 2. Reduced motor nerve activation of muscles
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Effect of Muscle Loss on Lifestyle and Health- A viscous cycle Weakened muscles lead to decreased joint stability, increasing risk of injury, which would impact ability to stay active, healthy Risk of falling and fear of falling in the elderly = decreased activity, decreased independence Decreased respiratory muscle function = decreased CV activity/fitness, further contributing to loss of strength Aging can’t be prevented, but it can be slowed * Muscles respond positively to training at all ages
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Benefits of Adequate Strength Levels Crucial for daily activities: Sitting, walking, running, lifting, carrying, recreational activities Improves posture, personal appearance, self-image Promotes joint stability, lessens the risk for injury Helps people cope more effectively in emergency situations Helps increase and maintain muscle mass, resulting in higher resting metabolic rate Promotes weight loss and maintenance Prevents osteoporosis Reduces chronic low back pain, arthritic pain Improves cholesterol levels, may help lower blood pressure
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This note was uploaded on 11/10/2011 for the course HPS 1000 taught by Professor Lowry during the Fall '07 term at Kennesaw.

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Chapter3 - Chapter 3 Muscular Strength and Endurance Key Terms ability of a muscle to exert Muscular strength The maximum force against resistance

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