chapter6%20Body%20Comp%20and%20Weight%20Management

chapter6%20Body%20Comp%20and%20Weight%20Management - Body...

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Body Composition & Weight Management
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Body composition: The fat and nonfat components of the human body Lean body mass: Non-fat components of body weight, which includes Percent body fat: Proportional amount of fat in the body based on the person’s total weight; includes both: essential fat – fat which is necessary for normal physiological functions 3% of total fat in Males and 12% for females (sex specific fat required for energy requirements of pregnancy and lactation. storage fat- Fat mass in excess of essential fat Approx 50% stored subcutaneously, with the remainder stored viscerally around organs
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Overfat vs. Overweight vs. Obese Overweight: Excess body weight against a given standard such as height; does not consider fat:lean mass ratio, therefore a poor measure of health related fitness. BMI of 25 Overfat : Refers to a percentage of body fat which compromises health Obesity: A chronic condition characterized by excessive body fat in relation to lean body mass; usually at 10% above optimal fat percentage. At this point, fat mass presents a critical health risk. Optimal fat %age for males is 15% or less, therefore obesity is defined as 25%+ Optimal fat %age for females is 22-23% or less, therefore obesity is defined as 32-33%+ (table 6.3). BMI of 30
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Problems with Excess Fat Evidence strongly links obesity with any number of chronic diseases, including but not limited to: Heart disease Hypercholestrolemia Hypertension Stroke Diabetes- not if, but when Certain Cancers In addition to disease risks, additional problems may impact a person’s “Wellness” in complex social, emotional, and occupational ways. Furthermore, excess fat weight often leads to less inclination to participate in healthy physical activities.
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Assessing Body Composition Determining body comp can be a valuable tool in developing an overall plan for promoting good health Various methods available, each with certain pros and cons Direct Measures- Dissection of cadaver Indirect Measures- Estimating body fat percentages based on protocol
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Hydrostatic Weighing Underwater weighing Most common technique used for decades A person’s “regular” weight is compared with underwater weight Fat is more buoyant than lean tissue Almost all other indirect techniques have been validated against hydrostatic weighing
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Skinfold Thickness Based on the principle that approximately half of the body’s fatty tissue is directly beneath skin (proportional to total body fat) Reliable measurements of this tissue give a good indication of percent body fat Skinfold test is done with pressure calipers Several sites are measured and percent fat is estimated from the sum of the three sites Accuracy improves with training, experience of assessor
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Anatomical Landmarks for Skinfold Measurements Chest Abdomen Triceps Suprailium Thigh
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This note was uploaded on 11/10/2011 for the course HPS 1000 taught by Professor Lowry during the Fall '07 term at Kennesaw.

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chapter6%20Body%20Comp%20and%20Weight%20Management - Body...

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