SM%2009_promotion

SM%2009_promotion - Introduction to Sport Marketing Lecture...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–11. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Introduction to Sport Marketing Lecture 9: Sport Promotion Lecture 9. Overview Define the term promotion. Outline the elements of the promotions mix. Describe the strengths and weaknesses of each element of the promotions mix. Identify the three main goals of promotions. Explain the steps involved in planning a promotions approach. Promotion and the Sport Marketing Framework Introduction Common to think of promotion as being nothing but advertising: Commercials on the television, radio, Internet and in the print media Other common applications of promotional activities include: Face-to-face personal selling Free samples Trade shows Contests and give-aways. Promotion In sport marketing the word promotion covers a range of interrelated activities. Promotion is about communicating with consumers by offering information about the sport products Promotion involves all forms of communication with consumers, not just advertising. Promotion is the way that sport marketers communicate with consumers to inform, persuade and remind them about a product. The aim of promotion is to encourage consumers to develop a favourable opinion about a sport product Aligned to a predetermined positioning strategy Promotion concentrates on selling the product. Principle 9.1: Promotion can be defined as the way that sport marketers communicate with consumers to inform, persuade and remind them about the features and benefits described by a sport product’s positioning. The Promotions Mix Sport organizations use a number of different promotional activities simultaneously Because different promotional activities can be combined together, they are collectively known as the promotions mix. Advantageous to combine a number of promotional activities together into one promotional plan or strategy. A promotional strategy is a plan that aims to use the four main elements: Advertising Personal selling Sales promotions Public relations. Principle 9.2: The promotions mix consists of four marketing tools: 1) advertising, 2) personal selling, 3) sales promotions and 4) public relations. Tool 9.1: Advertising. Advertising is a form of one-way communication where a marketer pays someone else to have their product, brand or organization identified. Common examples include television commercials, magazine and newspaper advertisements, radio spots, posters, billboards, Internet pop-ups, and advertisements on pubic transport. Tool 9.2: Personal Selling.Tool 9....
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 11/10/2011 for the course MKTG 4870 taught by Professor Deborahlester during the Fall '11 term at Kennesaw.

Page1 / 33

SM%2009_promotion - Introduction to Sport Marketing Lecture...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 11. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online