Economic independence is a primary goal for many of the oppressed in the United States

Economic independence is a primary goal for many of the oppressed in the United States

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Economic independence is a primary goal for many of the oppressed in the United States. In American society work is the preferred avenue people follow in pursuit of economic independence. Often, however, those most in need in society have the greatest difficulty finding work (or at least work that offers adequate compensation). The material presented in this article specifically targets women. Much of it, however, applies to economically disadvantaged minorities overall. An overarching theme in this article calls attention to a concept of institutional discrimination . Legal discrimination is, after all, illegal. Presumably, if one can document legal discrimination, one can remove such discrimination through the courts or legislatures. Institutional discrimination, on the other hand, is much more insidious
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Unformatted text preview: and, therefore, more difficult to rectify. Institutional discrimination resides within the fabric of society. Harrington (1984) poetically called institutional discrimination "structures of misery. " Eitzen and Baca-Zinn (1994:174) describe institutional discrimination as "the customary ways of doing things, prevailing attitudes and expectations, and accepted structural arrangements [that] works to the disadvantage [of the poor]. " Institutional discrimination explains much inequality in gender (and race and ethnicity) found in the workplace. The specifics of this article explore earnings discrimination, occupational distribution, the organization of work, and the character of relationships within the family where, according to many, the essence of gender inequality resides....
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This note was uploaded on 11/09/2011 for the course SCIE SYG2000 taught by Professor Bernhardt during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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