Selecting the Criminal

Selecting the Criminal - Selecting the Criminal Selecting...

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Selecting the Criminal Selecting the criminal explains why the prison population has the socio-demographic characteristics that it has. The prison population does not look like the population of people who commit crimes. A. The Political Process The definition of which behavior is considered as criminal begins in political bodies such as city councils, state legislatures, or Congress (see Reiman, 1998). These political bodies pass laws against certain kinds of behavior. Legislative bodies decide penalties for violating the laws they pass. B. Selection by the Victim Two out of three crimes are never reported to the police . They victim makes a decision whether to report. Robertson (1989:127) contends there are two factors which determine whether or not a given offender moves to the next stage. 1. The seriousness of the offense. 2. The status of the offender. With reference to the seriousness of the offense, petty crimes and white-collar crimes seldom come to the attention of the police. The social status of the offender has great
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This note was uploaded on 11/09/2011 for the course SCIE SYG2000 taught by Professor Bernhardt during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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