Structural Considerations Affecting Population Policy

Structural Considerations Affecting Population Policy -...

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Structural Considerations Affecting Population Policy A. What is Dependency? Demographers make the assumption that most of the people between the ages of fifteen and sixty-five are working and that people between the ages of zero to fifteen and sixty-five and over are dependent on those who work. People view children and the elderly as dependent on those who work (Weeks, 1996:257). B. Dependency within the Family Compare two families with equal resources. One family, however, has two children while the other family has ten children. The family with ten children has to spend more of the family resources on providing essentials for the family's survival (food, shelter, etc.). A smaller family does not have to spend as much as the larger family on necessities. The extra money can be used to build security (savings account, a new car, new house). C. Dependency at a National Level: Dependency Ratios Nation states experience the same problems that families do when the number of dependents in the population is too large compared to the number of people who are
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This note was uploaded on 11/09/2011 for the course SCIE SYG2000 taught by Professor Bernhardt during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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Structural Considerations Affecting Population Policy -...

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