This strong inverse relationship between SES and mental disorder may be due to class bias and the la

This strong inverse relationship between SES and mental disorder may be due to class bias and the la

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
This strong inverse relationship between SES and mental disorder may be due to class bias and the labeling process. Middle-class psychiatrists find lower-class behavior troublesome and are more likely to label it disordered than the behavior of middle-class persons. Mental health is judged by a middle-class yardstick. Much of the behavior of the psychiatrically disordered is deemed undesirable by members of all social classes. Stress Economic deprivation, poverty, occupational instability and unemployment are strongly related to psychological impairment. Social selection or the drift hypothesis Social class is a consequence rather than a cause of mental illness. The mentally disordered are incapable of achieving a higher position on the SES hierarchy because they are mentally disordered. Members of the lower class who are mentally disordered are either stuck there or have drifted there because their mental disorder prevents them form achieving a higher position. Their disorder retards their social
Background image of page 1
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: mobility. It is likely that social class contributes more to mental disorder than mental disorder contributes to social class. On Being Sane in Insane Places "If sanity and insanity exist, how shall we know them?" David Rosenhan decided to answer this question by having eight normal or "sane" persons including, himself, gain "secret admission" to 12 different mental hospitals around the country complaining of hearing hallucinatory voices. All were admitted with a diagnosis of schizophrenia, except one, which was diagnosed as a manic-depressive. All were released with a diagnosis of "in remission," without signs of mental illness. Rosenhan's conclusion is that psychiatry "cannot distinguish the sane from the insane." For Rosenhan, the fact that no one detected the pseudo patients as "sane" and they were released with a diagnosis of "in remission" was significant; this means that in the judgment of the hospital, they were neither sane, nor had they been sane at any time....
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 11/09/2011 for the course SCIE SYG2000 taught by Professor Bernhardt during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

Ask a homework question - tutors are online