Describe the interaction of the lungs

Describe the interaction of the lungs - Describe the...

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Describe the interaction of the lungs, pleural membranes, ribs, and diaphragm in the breathing process Like most internal organs, each lung is enclosed in a double-layered sac the pleural membranes. The inner-most of these membranes (the visceral pleura) is intimately connected to the lung itself. Between the inner and outer (parietal pleura) membranes is a space in which the pressure is less than atmospheric (less by 5-10 atm.); this is what is often referred to as "negative pressure". As the thorax expands during inspiration (ribs raised, diaphragm lowered), the pleural space expands and the sub-atmospheric pressure is further decreased (due to Boyle's Law of gases); this assists in drawing air into the lungs. The reverse takes place during exhalation. If you get stabbed in the chest, the lung would collapse due to the destruction of the sub-atmospheric pressure in the pleural sacs in which the pressure would now be equal to that of the atmosphere. It is known as a pneumothorax.
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This note was uploaded on 11/08/2011 for the course BIOLOGY BSC1086L taught by Professor Leostouder during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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Describe the interaction of the lungs - Describe the...

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