Evolutionary Developmental Biology Lecture 1

Evolutionary Developmental Biology Lecture 1 - Evolutionary...

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Evolutionary Developmental Biology Lecture 1. Why do we classify animals? How do we classify animals? We start off from a series of assumptions: 1. That all animals are not the same This assumption is built into our view of the world. In modern terms we would probably argue something like this: First of all, we are told that no two individuals are alike except identical twins. Identical twins, we are told, are derived from a single egg which splits at some point in the developmental process to make two individuals with the same set of genes, the same DNA. Any differences between identical twins must therefore be due to differences in their environments. Twins are usually brought up together, and so usually share an environment. Differences are maximised if the pair is split up at some point and brought up separately: this may maximise differences in things like IQ. We can see that individuals who are not identical twins will have less similarity to each other, less genes in common: brothers and sisters will be similar, so will parents and offspring. Uncles
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This note was uploaded on 11/08/2011 for the course BIOLOGY BSC1086L taught by Professor Leostouder during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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Evolutionary Developmental Biology Lecture 1 - Evolutionary...

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