Explain the roles of carbon dioxide and hydrogen ions in stimulating the breathing centre in the med

Explain the roles of carbon dioxide and hydrogen ions in stimulating the breathing centre in the med

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Explain the roles of carbon dioxide and hydrogen ions in stimulating the breathing centre in the medulla oblongata As the carbon dioxide levels in the blood increase, respiratory centers in the brain (medulla) are stimulated and the respiratory rate increases. Too little carbon dioxide in the blood will decrease respiratory stimuli. The hydrogen levels in the blood (i.e., blood acidity or low blood pH) will have a similar effect to that of carbon dioxide. Respiratory rates are controlled by the respiratory centers in the medulla oblongata which stimulate the diaphragm and intercostal muscles via the phrenic nerves. - If hyperventilation occurs it will "wash out" the carbon dioxide and hydrogen ions and thus decrease the respiratory rate and depth. - Holding your breath causes accumulation of carbon dioxide and hydrogen ions in the blood and will thus increase the rate and depth of respiration when breathing is resumed. Describe the exchange of carbon dioxide and oxygen during external and internal
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This note was uploaded on 11/08/2011 for the course BIOLOGY BSC1086L taught by Professor Leostouder during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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