Homeostasis - Homeostasis When you really think about the...

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Homeostasis When you really think about the fact that your body contains trillions of cells in nearly constant activity, and that remarkably little usually goes wrong with it, you begin to appreciate what a marvelous machine your body really is. The word homeostasis (ho0me-o-sta-sis) describes the body’s ability to maintain relatively stable internal conditions even though the outside world is continuously changing. Although the literal translation of homeostasis is “unchanging” ( homeo 5 the same; stasis 5 standing still), the term does not really mean an unchanging state. Instead, it indicates a dynamic state of equilibrium, or a balance in which internal conditions change and vary, but always within relatively narrow limits. In general, the body is in homeostasis when its needs are being adequately met and it is functioning smoothly. Virtually every organ system plays a role in maintaining the constancy of the internal environment. Adequate blood levels of vital nutrients must be continuously present, and heart activity and blood pressure must be constantly monitored and adjusted so that the blood is propelled with adequate force to reach all body tissues. Additionally, wastes must not be allowed to accumulate, and body temperature must be precisely controlled. Homeostatic Control Mechanisms
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This note was uploaded on 11/08/2011 for the course BIOLOGY BSC1086L taught by Professor Leostouder during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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Homeostasis - Homeostasis When you really think about the...

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