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Running head: BLOCKBUSTER FINANCIAL ANALYSIS1Blockbuster Financial AnalysisStudent’s NameInstitution
BLOCKBUSTER FINANCIAL ANALYSIS2Blockbuster Blockbuster was once the world’s largest film rental company in the 1990s and enjoyed the premier position in the domestic and international home entertainment markets for over two decades. It dominated the industry’s market share due to its diverse outlets, especially in the United States. However, the business collapsed when newcomers such as Netflix entered the video rental market. Its downfall was also attributed to the company’s failure to make necessary adjustments when the industry’s dynamics shifted digitally. It sold much of its shares, closed almost all of its stores closed, leading to its collapse. Due to huge debts and lack of sustainability,Blockbuster filed for bankruptcy protection on September 23, 2010, declaring a $930 million debt (“Blockbuster Inc.,” n.d.). In 2011, the Dish Network bought what was left of Blockbuster for $320 million (“Blockbuster Inc.,” n.d.). However, Blockbuster still has one operational store in Bend, Oregon, used and marketed as Dish Network’s On-Demand experience (Dish, 2017). Blockbuster Financial AnalysisBlockbuster’s revenues were high in the 1990s as the company expanded its business internationally to countries outside the United States (“Blockbuster Inc.,” n.d.). It provided its services to Latin America, Australia, the United Kingdom, and other European countries. The company expanded further to Japan, Guam, and New Zealand. It purchased Citivisin PLC, whichwas at the time one of the major video chains in Great Britain (“Blockbuster Inc.,” n.d.). The

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