Multicellular animals do not have most of their cells in contact with the external environment and s

Multicellular animals do not have most of their cells in contact with the external environment and s

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Multicellular animals do not have most of their cells in contact with the external environment and so have developed circulatory systems to transport nutrients, oxygen, carbon dioxide and metabolic wastes. Components of the circulatory system include blood: a connective tissue of liquid plasma and cells heart: a muscular pump to move the blood blood vessels: arteries, capillaries and veins that deliver blood to all tissues There are several types of circulatory systems. The
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Unformatted text preview: open circulatory system , examples of which are diagrammed in Figure 2, is common to molluscs and arthropods. Open circulatory systems (evolved in insects, mollusks and other invertebrates) pump blood into a hemocoel with the blood diffusing back to the circulatory system between cells. Blood is pumped by a heart into the body cavities, where tissues are surrounded by the blood. The resulting blood flow is sluggish....
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Multicellular animals do not have most of their cells in contact with the external environment and s

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