An Evaluation of the A Priori Argument

An Evaluation of the A Priori Argument -...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
An Evaluation of the A Priori Argument The above line of argument is an interesting one, but I believe that it is unsound, primarily for the  following reasons: (1) In translating a strange language into one's own, the demand for agreement in judgments  varies radically , depending upon the content of the sentences that one is translating. Thus, for  example, if one translates certain foreign expressions as color words in such a way that the color  judgments of speakers of the other language are almost always in disagreement with one's own  color judgments, then that is very strong evidence that one's translation is wrong. Suppose, in  contrast, that one is translating the religious utterances of someone else into one's own language,  and one winds up attributing to the other person magical beliefs, or theological beliefs, that one  regards as false, or even absurd. One might, for example, find that if one translated a certain term  in their language by the word "witch", it turned out that people in that society believed that there  were in fact many women who had entered into contracts with the devil. Would that be strong  evidence that the translation was mistaken? Surely not. What, then, is the difference between the two cases? The relevant difference would seem to be 
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 2

An Evaluation of the A Priori Argument -...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online