Direct Realism - DirectRealism setoutearlier.Theone,, s

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Direct Realism Let us now turn to two accounts of the justification of memory beliefs that correspond to two  very important strategies that can be employed in responding to the general skeptical argument  set out earlier. The one, which will be considered in the next section, involves the attempt to  show that one can make use of hypothetico-deductive reasoning, or inference to the best  explanation, to establish that memory beliefs are inferentially justified. The other, which we shall  begin to consider in this section, involves what is often referred to as a direct realist approach to  memory, and here the central claim is, as a first approximation, that memory beliefs are  noninferentially justified . Let us consider, then, a direct realist view of memory. One way of formulating this view is the  one just mentioned - that is, as the view that memory beliefs are noninferentially justified. There  is, as we shall see shortly, a different, and somewhat more modest way of formulating the direct  realist view. But let us begin with the version according to which memory beliefs are  noninferentially justified. When it is claimed that some belief is noninferentially justified, one always needs to go on to ask  what the basis is - that is, what state of affairs is the ground of one's being thus noninferentially  justified in accepting the belief in question. In the case of memory beliefs, there are at least three  different answers that might be given: (1) The basis of A's being noninferentially justified in accepting a certain belief, p, about the past  is that A has a corresponding memory  image ; (2) The basis of A's being noninferentially justified in accepting a certain belief, p, about the past  is that A has the  belief  that p; (3) The basis of A's being noninferentially justified in accepting a certain belief, p, about the past  is that A has the  thought  that p. The first two versions of the direct realist theory of memory knowledge, parallel the two different  versions of direct realism with respect to perceptual knowledge advanced by Sellars and  Armstrong, and discussed in an earlier chapter. . Thus, just as Sellars accepts the existence of  qualitative, non-intentional, perceptual experiences in setting out an account of perception, so the  first version of direct realism involves reference to memory images . But this approach, while  holding that there are memory images, maintains that one's beliefs about the past are not inferred   from beliefs about those memory images - just as Sellars maintains that one's perceptual beliefs  about the external world are not inferred from beliefs about one's sensory experiences. In 
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

Page1 / 4

Direct Realism - DirectRealism setoutearlier.Theone,, s

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online