Epistemology - Epistemology Questions of analysis and...

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Epistemology Questions of analysis and justification both loom large in epistemology - though it is questions of justification that are, it would seem, most central. 1.2.1 Analysis Analysis comes into epistemology in two main ways: (1) There is the analysis of fundamental epistemological concepts. Of those concepts, the most obvious is the concept of knowledge itself. But it turns out that there are other concepts that are important as one investigates various problems. Especially important for many later discussions in this class will be the related concepts of (a) a belief that is inferred from another belief, and (b) a belief's being inferentially justified, or being a case of inferential knowledge. Other important concepts include: (i) absolute certainty; (ii) degrees of belief; (iii) subjunctive conditionals, or counterfactual statements. (2) Secondly, there is the analysis of different types of statements, such as: (a) statements about physical objects; (b) statements about other minds and their mental states - beliefs, desires,
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Epistemology - Epistemology Questions of analysis and...

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