The Many - discovered. The MU hypothesis cannot replicate...

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The Many-Universes Hypothesis: Observer Selection Consider this alternative hypothesis: there are an infinite number (or astronomically large number) of universes like our observable universe, existing in other, inaccessible dimensions. The laws and fundamental constants of these universes vary randomly from one to the other. Observers like us can exist only in universes with uniform laws and anthropic values. Responses: [See my web site .] Supererogatory goodness of creation: the laws of nature seem more uniform, elegant than they would have to be. Evidence of intentional fine-tuning. The universe shows signs of having been constructed in such a way that extraordinary fine-tuning was both necessary (for life to exist) and possible (given the basic structure of natural laws). Example: Hugh Ross has been successfully predicting for over 20 years that new examples of fine-tuning would be
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Unformatted text preview: discovered. The MU hypothesis cannot replicate this success. John Leslie's "Further Evidences" chapter in Universes (Routledge. 1989): several fundamental constants had to be fine-tuned to meet several independent requirements. It's a surprising coincidence that it is possible to find a single value that simultaneously meets all of these needs. The existence of a sufficiently large number of sufficiently varied universes is itself a coincidence in need of theistic explanation (see Leslie again). The MU hypothesis cannot explain why life arose so rapidly on the earth's surface (within about 10 million years of the solidifying of the crust). It has to be combined with some form of panspermia (the idea that earth was "seeded" with extraterrestrial life). This is beginning to look a little far-fetched!...
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