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Looking at Somebody Else

Looking at Somebody Else - Looking at Somebody Else’s...

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Unformatted text preview: Looking at Somebody Else’s Clock Let us now consider two observers, Jack and Jill, each equipped with a calibrated inertial frame of reference, and a light clock. To be specific, imagine Jack standing on the ground with his light clock next to a straight railroad line, while Jill and her clock are on a large flatbed railroad wagon which is moving down the track at a constant speed v . Jack now decides to check Jill’s light clock against his own. He knows the time for his clock is 2 w/c between clicks. Imagine it to be a slightly misty day, so with binoculars he can actually see the blip of light bouncing between the mirrors of Jill’s clock. How long does he think that blip takes to make a round trip? The one thing he’s sure of is that it must be moving at c = 186,300 miles per second, relative to him— that’s what Einstein tells him. So to find the round trip time, all he needs is the round trip distance. This will not be 2 w , because the mirrors are on the flatbed wagon moving down the track, so, relative to Jack on the ground, when the blip gets back to the top mirror, that mirror has...
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