Critique of Pure Reaso3

Critique of Pure Reaso3 - Critique of Pure Reason Lecture...

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Critique of Pure Reason Lecture notes, February 10, 1997: Causality The Analogies of Experience are supposed to provide principles for the determination of objects with respect to time. The most general aspects of time with respect to the way objects of experience can be represented are: duration, succession and coexistence. The First Analogy concerned the way in which we can consider objects as enduring, and that is as permanent substances with transitory accidents. Kant claimed that all change is the replacement of one accident of an existing substance with another, such that creation or annihilation of substance is impossible. The justification of this principle is based on the claim that without it, the experience would lose its unity, specifically because it would allow the possibility of two distinct time streams. It is essential to Kant's argument that the objects with which he is concerned are those of experience, and not things in themselves. Everything turns on the claim that
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Critique of Pure Reaso3 - Critique of Pure Reason Lecture...

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