For a measure to be reliable

For a measure to be reliable - , measuring. Forexample,

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
For a measure to be reliable, you must measure what you think you are  measuring. You must be correctly connected to reality.  For example, if you read a humidity gauge and believe you are reading a  temperature gauge it is extremely unlikely that people will be able to  replicate your effect when they follow your instructions to read a  temperature gauge. If you view a thermometer from an extreme angle and  get a parallax error in your measure, then your measure will not be  replicable by either people who measure the temperature correctly or who  measure it with their own inaccuracy. You must be correctly connected to  reality.  If you measure something indirectly you must assure yourself that you  have measured what you thought you measured. Indirect measures are  prone to error, invalidity, and unreliability. Use direct measures whenever  possible. If you ask people what they will do in a crisis, you cannot 
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 11/09/2011 for the course PSY PSY2012 taught by Professor Scheff during the Fall '09 term at Broward College.

Page1 / 2

For a measure to be reliable - , measuring. Forexample,

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online