If we were to accept that all things were randomly determined

If we were to accept that all things were randomly determined

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If we were to accept that all things were randomly determined, we could  easily "explain" any differences in our dependent variables, we could say  "it just happened that way for no reason," but we would cease to  productively function. If things have no cause, how are we to predict,  control, synthesize, and explain? As a matter of principle, we must assume  that things occur for a reason, and that we can understand that reason.  We, therefore, must presume that any difference in our measure is the  result of different deterministic causes.  At a more practical level however, we will also have to accept that the  deterministic source of the variation is sometimes beyond our resolving  power. We get things handed to us like the distribution of electrons in any  single atomic shell. The dilemma is that if we accept randomness at the  broadest level, science ceases -- everything is simply random. If two 
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This note was uploaded on 11/09/2011 for the course PSY PSY2012 taught by Professor Scheff during the Fall '09 term at Broward College.

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If we were to accept that all things were randomly determined

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