{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

In this system all the properties of nominal and ordinal numbers are included

In this system all the properties of nominal and ordinal numbers are included

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
In this system all the properties of nominal and ordinal numbers are included. In  addition, the intervals between numbers are also equal. The difference between  numbers is therefore the same, for example, 36 degrees Celsius is the same amount  above 35 degrees as 200 degrees is above 199 degrees. One degree is equal to one  degree. However, interval numbers lack a true zero. 100 degrees is not twice as hot  as 50 degrees. Using a more obvious representation (100 + x) degrees is not 2 times  larger than (50 + x) degrees because the x term would also have to be considered.  The figure below illustrates this effect with the arbitrary zero axis as a dotted line  and the true axis as a solid line. While 4 is twice as high above the arbitrary axis as  2, it is not twice as high above the real origin. It can be seen that the true measure 
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: can be like an entire iceberg while the measure based on an arbitrary zero measure (an interval number) is like what is above the surface of the water. Twice as high above the water is not the same as twice as high altogether, if the icebergs move to fresh water their relative size above the water will change. In this system all the above attributes of the other number systems are included. In addition, zero means the absence of the property. For example, in the Kelvin scale of temperature, 0 degrees means absolute zero, the absence of molecular motion and therefore the absence of temperature. Two degrees Kelvin is twice as hot as 1 degree Kelvin. Ratio numbers are what most people mean when they talk without qualifications about numbers. The following figure illustrates measurement scales....
View Full Document

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern