Is there another basis for judgments

Is there another basis for judgments - Is there another...

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Is there another basis for judgments, besides experience? And if so, what could it be? Kant answers the first question in the affirmative, by noting that empirical judgments are one and all contingent and only relatively universal. Whatever I judge to be the case on the basis of experience, I recognize might not be the case. Things might have been otherwise than what they are: California might have generally bad weather. Empirical judgments are sometimes called judgments a posteriori . So whatever is judged with necessity has a basis other than experience. Further, what I judge empirically is not strictly universal , that is, there is always the possibility of exception. Kant took it as established by Hume that experience can never use induction to rule out an exception. No matter how many cases have been observed, still others are possible, and they might be different from what has been observed. Thus, Kant claimed that the two criteria of a judgment not based on experience are
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Is there another basis for judgments - Is there another...

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