It must be noted that Kant frequently writes of intuitions as being objects

It must be noted that Kant frequently writes of intuitions as being objects

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It must be noted that Kant frequently writes of intuitions as being objects. In defining his key terms, Kant stats that, "An objective perception is cognition ( cognitio ). This is either intution or concept ( intuitus vel conceptus ). The former relates immediately to the object and is single, the latter refers to it mediately by means of a feature which several things have in common." In his opening remarks in the Transcendental Logic, he states that through receptivity "an object is given to us," and through spontaneity, "the object is thought through that representation" (A50/B74). Again, "Without sensibility, no object would be given to us, without understanding, no object would be thought" But in Section 14, when recapitulating the distinction, Kant notes that the objects of intuition are only given as appearances (which he had earlier defined, at A20/B34, as an "undetermined" object). "Now all experience does indeed contain, in addition to the intuition of the senses through which something is given, a concept of an object as
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This note was uploaded on 11/09/2011 for the course PSY PSY2012 taught by Professor Scheff during the Fall '09 term at Broward College.

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It must be noted that Kant frequently writes of intuitions as being objects

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