Kant begins his discussion of the understanding by making a number of distinctions between types of

Kant begins his discussion of the understanding by making a number of distinctions between types of

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Kant begins his discussion of the understanding by making a number of distinctions between types of logic. The first is between general and special logic. General logic holds for all objects whatsoever, while special logic applies only to objects of a certain type. Some examples of special logic taken from contemporary philosophy might be quantum logic (restricted to the peculiar realm of quantum mechanics) and denotic logic (restricted to the concepts of obligation and permission). This logic is an "organon" of the specific "science" to which it applies, according to Kant. This means that it contains substantive principles of that science. The next distinction is that between pure and applied general logic. Applied logic is overtly psychological. "It treats of attention, its impediments and consequences, of the source of error, of the state of doubt, conviction, etc." (A54/B78-9). To some extent, this is reminiscent of an epistemological view known as externalism. According to this view, whether one knows depends on whether one is related properly to the facts
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Kant begins his discussion of the understanding by making a number of distinctions between types of

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