So time is the mode by which we represent our inner states

So time is the mode by which we represent our inner states...

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So time is the mode by which we represent our inner states, and through those state the states of things outside us. Time is ideal, a form of inner sense, and the self which we experience (the "empirical self") is thus an appearance, not a thing in itself. This doctrine gave rise to Lambert's objection, discussed in the "Elucidation." Since change depends on time, then the self, as a thing in itself, is not subject to change, or, if it is, it is real. But time is said to be ideal. In response, Kant claimed that time is real, it is "the real form of inner intuition." Still, this leaves Kant in the position of having to admit that if we were able to know ourselves as things in themselves, we would not be able to attribute change to ourselves. And this raises the troublesome question of why Kant could appeal to the successiveness of our activity of representing, as he does later in the Critique . Critique of Pure Reason
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So time is the mode by which we represent our inner states...

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