The third step in building a logical foundation for your practice of psychology is to determine what

The third step in building a logical foundation for your practice of psychology is to determine what

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The third step in building a logical foundation for your practice of  psychology is to determine what do these words "truth" and  "understanding" really mean? So far we have seen that we as psychologists  should demand "truth", and should "understand" our subject matter if we  are to satisfy our goal of being "ethical" and "pragmatic." Simply put,  "understanding the truth will make you free." But, we have relied on only  our intuitive feeling for the meaning of truth and understanding. What is  proper and acceptable evidence? When can we claim to understand  something? As a minimum we need to know how to prove to someone that  we are speaking the truth and that we understand what we are doing.  There must be rules to screen-out knowing-that-you're-right, opinion, bias  and conjecture from the truth. Simply put, what does the word truth  mean? What makes something true? In essence truth is an accurate 
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This note was uploaded on 11/09/2011 for the course PSY PSY2012 taught by Professor Scheff during the Fall '09 term at Broward College.

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The third step in building a logical foundation for your practice of psychology is to determine what

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