The same reasoning applies to other ways of depicting grouped data such as bar graphs

The same reasoning applies to other ways of depicting grouped data such as bar graphs

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Unformatted text preview: The same reasoning applies to other ways of depicting grouped data such as bar graphs, histograms, polygons, and frequency distributions. Space is used to represent important attributes. A common convention is to use height or the ordinate to indicate frequency, and the distance to the right or left of the abscissa to indicate some other dimension. In the behavioral sciences the ordinate ( y ) is used to represent the dependent variable while the abscissa ( x ) represents the independent variable. (The word "acrossissa" can be used as a memory aid. It is almost the same as abscissa and across means back and forth and contains the word cross or x .) In these cases, the height or the ordinate indicates the frequency of that variable. The total area represents the total number of occurrences. The relative area of one part of the histogram or polygon to the area of the whole histogram or polygon represents...
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This note was uploaded on 11/09/2011 for the course PSY PSY2012 taught by Professor Scheff during the Fall '09 term at Broward College.

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The same reasoning applies to other ways of depicting grouped data such as bar graphs

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