The principle of sufficient reason states that whatever is actual

The principle of sufficient reason states that whatever is actual

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The principle of sufficient reason states that whatever is actual ,whatever exists, does so by virtue of a reason why it exists rather than not. Human reason can gain knowledge of what is actual by appeal to the principle of sufficient reason; that is, if it is known that there is a reason sufficient for the thing, then it is known that the thing exists. In Leibniz's system, we know that God has a sufficient to create the best possible world, so we know that the best possible world exists. Hume recognized that the principle of sufficient reason, if true at all, is a necessary truth. He then inquired as to the justification of such a principle. If it is necessarily true, then its opposite is impossible, and therefore its falsehood is unthinkable. But he held that we can always think the possibility that A exists without B, despite the belief that A is a sufficient reason for B. To be necessary, the principle of sufficient reason would have to be provable from the law of contradiction, but it cannot be. ( Wolff
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This note was uploaded on 11/09/2011 for the course PSY PSY2012 taught by Professor Scheff during the Fall '09 term at Broward College.

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