The relation of the ideas of the soul and God to morality are not so straightforward

The relation of the ideas of the soul and God to morality are not so straightforward

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The relation of the ideas of the soul and God to morality are not so straightforward. They are said to be conditions of the highest good, whose attainment is the highest end of practical reason. Kant described the highest good in the following way: "virtue and happiness together . . . and happiness in exact proportion to morality" for the whole world of moral agents. The moral law presupposes the possibility of the attainment of hte highest good, lest "the moral law which commands that it be furthered . . . be fantastic, directed to empty imaginary ends, and consequently inherently false" ( Critique of Practical Reason , Dialectic, I). The immortality of the soul is a postulate of pure practical reason, as a condition for the possibility of the highest good. The maximization of virtue requires that the will of an individual be in complete conformity to the moral law, which is impossible in this
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Unformatted text preview: life. "It can be found only in an endless progression to that complete fitness" of the will to the law ( Critique of Practical Reason , Dialectic, IV). Aside for being necessary for morality, this postulate is a pillar of religion, as promoting holiness of the will. God's existence is postulated to account for the possibility of happiness in proportion to virtue. Only a supreme cause of nature is capable of apportioning things in this way, since a reason for this proportionality cannot be found in nature itself. Such a cause must have will (its causality) and understanding (so that it can act in accordance with the idea of laws. Since it is our duty to promote the highest good, and necessary to postualte God's existence to account for its possible fulfillment, "it is morally necessary to assume the existence of God" ( ( Critique of Practical Reason , Dialectic, V)...
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This note was uploaded on 11/09/2011 for the course PSY PSY2012 taught by Professor Scheff during the Fall '09 term at Broward College.

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