The height of the curve above any point on the abscissa represents the frequency of that particular

The height of the curve above any point on the abscissa represents the frequency of that particular

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
    The height of the curve above any point on the abscissa represents the  frequency of that particular event, just as the height of the column had  represented the frequency of the event in the bar graph and histogram,  and just as the number of asterisks had represented frequency in the tally  record. The other relationships hold as well, in the case of the frequency  distribution however you cannot meaningfully talk about the probability of  an event represented by a single bar because the individual bars are  infinitely small. Where a histogram allowed you to choose all the data for  April by selecting a single bar a frequency distribution requires that you  specify all the data from one second after midnight on March 31 to  midnight April 30, i.e., specify the limits of the “bar” you want. One speaks  of the frequency of all events contained between point A and Point B on 
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 11/09/2011 for the course PSY PSY2012 taught by Professor Scheff during the Fall '09 term at Broward College.

Page1 / 2

The height of the curve above any point on the abscissa represents the frequency of that particular

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online