The Ontological Argument

The Ontological Argument - The Ontological Argument As...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
The Ontological Argument As stated above, the natural course of reason is to seek for something to fulfill the role of a necessary being, i.e., one whose non-existence is impossible. But it is difficult to conceive of such a being. Examples from geometry, where we find necessary propositions, do not help us find a necessary thing, one to whose concept existence belongs necessarily. A square necessarily has four equal sides, but it is not necessary that there exist a square. We are forced to devise such a concept a priori : the concept of that which necessarily exists. It is true that if such a thing exists , it exists necessarily, but this does not require that the the object of the concocted concept exist at all. "If its existence is rejected, we reject the thing itself with all its predicates" (A595/B623). There is no contradiction in rejecting the existence of a thing, even though we have placed existence in its concept. It might be held that the
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 11/09/2011 for the course PSY PSY2012 taught by Professor Scheff during the Fall '09 term at Broward College.

Page1 / 2

The Ontological Argument - The Ontological Argument As...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online