Adjective Adverb - PLEASE WRITE ON YOUR OWN PAPER...

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PLEASE WRITE ON YOUR OWN PAPER Adjective/Adverbs Adjectives modify nouns in a sentence and adverbs modify either verbs, adjectives, or other adverbs.  Adjectives and adverbs can show different degrees of quality or amount with the endings er and est or with the  words more and most (to compare upward) or less and least (to compare downward). Adjective Examples: Richard is careless . (Careless is modifying Richard, a noun). Debbie ate a giant  sandwich. (Giant is modifying sandwich, a noun). The winner of the lottery was lucky . (Lucky is modifying winner, a noun). Adverb Examples:  The marathon runner ran quickly . (Quickly is modifying the verb, ran). Tim was extremely  happy. (Extremely is modifying the adjective, happy). She worked unusually  quickly. (Unusually is modifying the adverb quickly). The positive form  of adjectives and adverbs describe something without using a comparison. Examples:   That is a big  book. (Big is describing the noun book). Donald Trump is a forceful  speaker. (Forceful is describing the noun speaker). To win the race, Joe needed to run quickly. (Quickly is describing the verb run). The comparative form  of adjectives and adverbs compares one thing with another. Examples:   My algebra book is bigger  than my biology book. Donald Trump is a more forceful  speaker than Bill Gates. In the marathon, Joe ran more quickly than his friend. The superlative form  of adjectives and adverbs compares three or more things. Examples:   My algebra book is the biggest book I own. Donald Trump is the most forceful speaker at the convention. In the marathon, Joe ran the quickest of all the participants. Using more  and most  is the only way to form the comparative and superlative for most adverbs of two or more  syllables (including nearly all of those adverbs ending in ly) and for adjectives of three or more syllables. Examples:    Adjectives and Adverbs 1
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PLEASE WRITE ON YOUR OWN PAPER Positive Comparative Superlative Adjectives- Beautiful More Beautiful Most Beautiful Interesting More Interesting Most Interesting Adverbs- Often More Often Most Often Sadly More Sadly Most Sadly The irregular modifiers change the spelling of their positive form to show comparative and superlative degrees. Examples: Positive Comparative Superlative Adjectives- Good Better Best Bad Worse Worst Little Littler/Less Littlest/Least Many  More Most Adverbs- Well Better Best Badly Worse Worst Basic Adjective and Adverb Rules 1. An adjective always follows a form of the verb “ to be ” when it modifies the noun before the verb. Examples:   I was nervous
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This note was uploaded on 11/10/2011 for the course ENGLISH ENC1101 taught by Professor Amador during the Fall '11 term at Broward College.

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Adjective Adverb - PLEASE WRITE ON YOUR OWN PAPER...

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