Fragments - PLEASE WRITE ON YOUR OWN PAPER...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
PLEASE WRITE ON YOUR OWN PAPER Fragments, Run-ons, and Comma Splices Fragments  are parts or pieces of something, incomplete in their form or meaning.  They may lack a subject, or  a predicate, or both.  Since a subject and a predicate are necessary to express a complete thought, a fragment  missing one of these parts at best expresses half of a thought. The following are typical of fragments found in student essays: Example:  Over 250,000 Americans who were involved in alcohol-related traffic accidents last year. Example:  Although I am working full-time. Example:  Because I had to appear in court for a speeding ticket. Example:  Especially someone with personality. Example:  More than $800 million spent on AIDS education this year. These fragments, or incompletely expressed thoughts, would make “grammatical sense” if they were written in  complete or sentence form.  Here are some possible revisions: Example:  Over 250,000 Americans who were involved in alcohol-related traffic accidents last year were  under the age of nineteen. Example:  Although I am working full-time, I still manage to do my homework. Example:  I missed three classes because I had to appear in court for a speeding ticket. Example:  A hard-working student, especially someone with personality, will certainly succeed. Example:  The report complained that more than $800 million was spent on AIDS education this year. Notice that in the above examples, some important words have been added to turn a fragment into a sentence.  Generally, to correct a fragment, you need to add a principal subject and a main verb. Grammatically speaking, fragments do not function independently.  They depend on a missing or previous  thought for their complete sense. Dependent  and  Independent   Clauses Think for just a moment about independent and dependent people.  An independent person is self-supporting  and functions on his/her own.  A dependent person is someone who relies on others for support.  Likewise,  fragments are  dependent  on something else—some grammatical unit for their “grammatical sense” or meaning. Fragments, Run-ons, & Comma Splices 1
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
PLEASE WRITE ON YOUR OWN PAPER Grammatically correct sentences contain subjects and verbs; however, a group of words may have both subject  and verb but still not express a complete thought.  This word group is called a dependent clause.  A  dependent  clause  punctuated as a sentence (that is, beginning with a capital letter and ending with a period) looks like a  sentence, but is a fragment. Practice 1:
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 11

Fragments - PLEASE WRITE ON YOUR OWN PAPER...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online