Annexation is the process where nations

Annexation is the process where nations - power for an...

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Annexatio n is the process where nations, particularly during wars or as a result of war, incorporate or attach land. This new land is contiguous to the nation, as in the Louisiana Purchase of 1803. The Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo that ended the Mexican American War in 1848 gave the United States California, Utah, Nevada, most of New Mexico, and parts of Arizona, Wyoming, and Colorado. Although the indigenous people in some of this large territory were dominant in their society one day, they became minority group members the next. When annexation occurs, the dominant power generally suppresses the language and culture of the minority, while minorities try to maintain their cultural integrity despite annexation. Colonialism has been the most common way for one group to dominate another. Colonialism is the maintenance of political, social, economic, and cultural dominance over people by a foreign
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Unformatted text preview: power for an extended period. Colonialism is rule by outsiders but, unlike annexation, does not involve actual incorporation into a dominant peoples nation. The long control exercised by the British Empire over much of North America, parts of Africa, and India is an example of colonial domination. Societies gain power over a foreign land through military strength, sophisticated political organization, and investment capital. Relations between the colonial nation and the colonized people are similar to those between a dominant group and exploited subordinate groups. The colonial subjects generally are limited to menial jobs and the wages from their labor. The natural resources of their land benefit the members of the ruling class....
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This note was uploaded on 11/08/2011 for the course SCIE SYG2000 taught by Professor Bernhardt during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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