The crossing of the Atlantic was a life

The crossing of the Atlantic was a life - The crossing of...

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• The crossing of the Atlantic was a life-threatening experience for the Irish, and those who survived could hope for only a slight improvement in their lives. Many of the ships were called “coffin ships” because they did not supply adequate food and water, they were overcrowded, and they were unsanitary. • The Irish immigrants were exploited from the beginning—even before they got off the ship. “Runners” employed by hotels or saloons boarded the ship and “took charge” of the newcomers’ luggage, bringing it to the hotel for “safekeeping.” Often the immigrants were tricked. The hotels overcharged them for meals or rooms and then took their luggage in payment. Another common fraud practiced by the runners involved the sale of passage tickets; only after the immigrants began their journey did they discover that the tickets were no good, or were good only for part of the distance. • The initial reaction of the dominant group to the Irish was overwhelmingly negative. Although workers were needed in the new nation, the general response of the dominant group to the Irish immigrants was marked by conflict, hostility, violence, and exploitation. The treatment of the
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This note was uploaded on 11/08/2011 for the course SCIE SYG2000 taught by Professor Bernhardt during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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The crossing of the Atlantic was a life - The crossing of...

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