The Reorganization Act

The Reorganization Act - The Reorganization Act The Indian...

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The Reorganization Act • The Indian Reorganization Act of 1934 (also known as the Wheeler-Howard Act ) recognized the need to use, rather than ignore, tribal identity. However, the goal was still assimilation, rather than a movement toward a pluralistic society. • Under the Reorganization Act, tribes could adopt a written constitution and elect a tribal council with a head. This system imposed foreign values and structures. Under it, the elected tribal leader represented an entire reservation, which might include several tribes, some hostile to one another. Further, the leader had to be elected by majority rule, a concept alien to many tribes. Many full-blooded Native Americans resented the provision that mixed-bloods were to have full voting rights. • Although the Reorganization act recognized the right of Native Americans to approve or reject some actions taken on their behalf, the act still maintained substantial non-Native American control over the reservations. The tribal governments owed their existence not to their people but
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The Reorganization Act - The Reorganization Act The Indian...

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