Zero Population Growth

Zero Population - metropolitan area must include at least one city or urban area with at least 50,000 residents and a total metropolitan population

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Zero Population Growth • With zero population growth , there is a totally stable population, one that neither grows nor decreases from year to year because births, deaths, and migration are in perfect balance. • The United States is nearing zero population growth because of several factors: 1) A high proportion of women and men in the labor force find satisfaction and rewards outside of family life 2) Birth control is inexpensive and readily available 3) The trend is toward later marriage 4) The cost of raising a child from birth to adulthood is rising rapidly 5) Schools and public service campaigns make teenagers more aware of how to control fertility Urbanization • A metropolitan area or metropolis is a densely populated core area, together with adjacent communities. The largest city in each metropolitan areas is designated as the “central city.” Current standards require that each newly qualifying
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Unformatted text preview: metropolitan area must include at least one city or urban area with at least 50,000 residents and a total metropolitan population of at least 100,000. • As of June 1998, there were 256 metropolitan areas in the United States; one U.S. state, New Jersey, is entirely occupied by metropolitan areas. • The United States is an urban nation, with four out of five Americans living in metropolitan areas. Within these metropolitan areas, there has been a dramatic population shift from the cities to the suburbs. Those who move to the suburbs are predominantly upper middle class, middle class, and to a lesser extent working class whites. • Urban sprawl refers to the low-density, automobile dependent development outside the central city. Urban sprawl absorbs farmland at a rate of about 50 acres an hour in the U.S., an area the size of Connecticut and Rhode Island every 10 years....
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This note was uploaded on 11/08/2011 for the course SCIE SYG2000 taught by Professor Bernhardt during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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