Lecture+5+September+21

Lecture+5+September+21 - Today in Comparative Politics...

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Today in Comparative Politics Theories of the state What is a state? Why do we need them? How did we get them? Contractarian v. predatory theories Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?
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Reminder First homework is due in recitation section this week. Questions posted on Sakai
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Rutgers University Semester Internship in Washington, Dc Spring 2010 Gain Professional Experience Intern Through Political Science Dept. All Majors Welcome Information Sessions THURSDAY, September 24, 2009 9:00 AM-4:00 PM Rutgers Student Center – Atrium Conference Room THURSDAY, September 24, 2009 4:30 PM-6:30 PM Rutgers Student Center – Room 411A/B – CAC
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What Is the State? The state “is a human community that (successfully) claims the monopoly of the legitimate use of physical force within a given territory.” Max Weber “A state is an organization with a comparative advantage in violence, extending over a geographic area whose boundaries are determined by its power to tax constituents.” Douglass North States are “relatively centralized, differentiated organizations, the officials of which, more or less, successfully claim control over the chief concentrated means of violence within a population inhabiting a large, contiguous territory.” Charles Tilly
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What Is the State? Two common factors in these definitions: Defined territory Use or the threat of force to control inhabitants A state is an entity that uses coercion and the threat of force to rule in a given territory.
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Somalia: A Failed State
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Two models of the state 1. Contractarian view 2. Predatory view
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Contractarian View Thought experiment Hobbes Locke Rousseau What would life be like without a state? State of Nature How would people behave with no fear of punishment by a state for killing and stealing?
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The costs of individualism Thomas Hobbes, Leviathan , 1651 State of nature: situation of individuals in the absence of government and civil society “ that dissolute condition of masterlesse men, without subjection to Lawes, and a coercive Power to tye their hands from rapine, and revenge”
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State of nature “no place for industry, because the fruit thereof is uncertain; and consequently no culture of the earth; no navigation, nor use of the commodities that may be imported by Sea; no commodious Building; no Instruments of moving and removing such things as require much force; no Knowledge of the face of the Earth; no account of Time; no Arts; no Letters; and which is worst of all,
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Lecture+5+September+21 - Today in Comparative Politics...

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