Lecture+18+December+7

Lecture+18+December+7 - Today in Comparative Politics...

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Today in Comparative Politics Parliamentary, Presidential and Mixed Democracies Two Visions of Democracy: Implications for Democratic Institutions Looking ahead… Final Exam College Avenue Main Gym Tuesday, December 22 12 to 3 pm Not in Scott 123!
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Final exam Tuesday, December 22 12 to 3 p.m. College Avenue Main Gym NOT in Scott !
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Three Types of Democracy Presidential Parliamentary Mixed Classification depends on the relationship between Government Legislature President (if any)
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Government A parliamentary democracy is one in which the government depends only on a legislative majority to exist. The government comprises a prime minister and the cabinet. The prime minister is the political chief executive and head of the government. The cabinet is composed of ministers who head the various government departments. In a parliamentary democracy, the executive branch = “ the government”
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What Distinguishes Them? A presidential democracy is one in which the government does not depend on a legislative majority to exist. A parliamentary democracy is one in which the government depends only on a legislative majority to exist. A mixed democracy is one in which the government depends on a legislative majority and on an independently elected president to exist. Legislative responsibility : legislative majority has the constitutional power to remove a government from office without cause. Legislature removes a government by means of a vote of no confidence .
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Government Ministerial responsibility refers to the constitutional doctrine by which cabinet ministers must bear ultimate responsibility for what happens in their ministry. Collective cabinet responsibility refers to the doctrine by which ministers must publicly support collective cabinet decisions or resign.
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Government Formation New governments form in parliamentary democracies in two circumstances: 1. Following elections 2. During an inter-election period, following the resignation of the current government How do governments form? Government must enjoy the “confidence” of the legislature both to come to power and to stay in power. All governments need the support of a legislative majority.
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Which Parties Form the Government? A potential government must enjoy the confidence of the legislature to come to power. If a single party controlled a majority of the legislative seats, that party usually forms the government. But what happens when there is no majority party? It is relatively rare to have majority parties in parliamentary democracies. 81% of the governments that formed in Western Europe from 1945 to 1998 emerged from political situations in which there was no majority party.
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Government Formation A formateur is the person designated to form the government; the formateur is often the PM designate. The leader from the party winning the most seats normally
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This note was uploaded on 11/10/2011 for the course POLI SCI 790:103 taught by Professor Blair during the Fall '09 term at Rutgers.

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Lecture+18+December+7 - Today in Comparative Politics...

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