Photosystem I - to NADPH. According to the following...

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Photosystem I At this point, the electron has little reducing capability (little energy is left). It is passed to the P700 antenna. A pigment molecule in the P700 antenna absorbs a photon of solar energy. The energy from that molecule is passed to neighboring molecules within the antenna. The energy is eventually passed to the reaction center of this antenna. As a result of being energized, the P700 reaction center loses the electron to an electron acceptor. The acceptor passes it to NADP + , which becomes reduced
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Unformatted text preview: to NADPH. According to the following equation, NADP + has the capacity to carry two electrons. NADP + + 2e-+ H + NADPH The electron transport system and photophosphorylation in the chloroplast is similar to the system found in the mitochondria to produce ATP during cellular respiration. The diagram below is a summary of the light reactions. High-energy components of the system are shown nearer the top of the diagram. The red arrows show the path of electrons from water to NADP + to form NADPH....
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This note was uploaded on 11/10/2011 for the course BIOLOGY bi 101 taught by Professor - during the Fall '10 term at Montgomery.

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Photosystem I - to NADPH. According to the following...

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