Polar Molecules

Polar Molecules - stronger attraction for electrons and...

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Polar Molecules Atoms vary in their attraction for electrons. The strength of this attraction is an atom's electronegativity . Two covalently-bonded atoms that differ in their electronegativity will not share electrons equally and the molecule will be polar . The atom that is more electronegative will exert a stronger attraction for the electrons and will therefore have a partial negative charge. The atom that is less electronegative will have a partial positive charge. In the drawing below, hydrogen shares one pair of electrons with chlorine by a single covalent bond. The electrons are not shared equally because chlorine is more electronegative; it has a
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Unformatted text preview: stronger attraction for electrons and thus a partial negative charge. The hydrogen has a partial positive charge because it has less access to the shared electrons. The diagram below shows that water is composed of two hydrogen atoms bonded to an oxygen atom by two covalent bonds. Each hydrogen atom shares one pair of electrons with the oxygen atom. Oxygen is much more electronegative than hydrogen and the shared electrons spend more time closer to the oxygen part of the molecule than to the hydrogen part. Unequal sharing of electrons results in the oxygen having a partial negative charge and the hydrogen atoms having a partial positive charge....
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This note was uploaded on 11/10/2011 for the course CHEM ch 101 taught by Professor - during the Fall '10 term at Montgomery.

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Polar Molecules - stronger attraction for electrons and...

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